Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Skin Disease Research Center

News and Announcements

Read the latest news from the Skin Disease Research Center at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. The links below take you to articles where you can learn more about the center, our leadership and our member’s latest achievements.

Announcements

  • Skin Disease Research Center Director, Amy Paller, MD, selected as the recipient of the 2018 Wilma Bergfeld MD Visionary and Leadership Award
    12.11.2017

    The Skin Disease Research Center is proud to announce that our very own director, Amy Paller, MD, has been selected by her colleagues of the Women's Dermatologic Society to be the recipient of the 2018 Wilma Bergfeld, MD Visionary & Leadership Award. 

    She will receive the award in San Diego on Sunday, February 18, 2018. 

     

  • Roopal Kundu, MD, featured in Northwestern Magazine's Fall Issue
    11.01.2017

    Click here to view the story on Assistant Professor of Dermatology and Associate Dean for Admissions, Roopal Kundu, MD.

     

    

     

     

  • Dermatology featured in Northwestern Magazine's Fall Issue
    11.01.2017

    Click here to view the feature on the Department of Dermatology.

     

     

  • Eversight announces grant award for Northwestern University researcher, Han Peng, PhD
    08.18.2017

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    ANN ARBOR, Mich. — Eversight, a global nonprofit network of eye banks, has awarded a $15,000 Eye and Vision Research Grant to Northwestern University’s Han Peng, Ph.D.

    Dr. Peng was among nine recipients who received grants from Eversight for projects that aligned with the organization’s mission to restore sight and prevent blindness. The awards were determined by an independent review panel composed of distinguished scientists, ophthalmologists and health services researchers.

    Dr. Peng, a research assistant professor in the department of dermatology at Feinberg School of Medicine, is investigating a possible approach for improving the treatment of limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD), a problem that is often not recognized and treated in its early stages and may lead to corneal ulceration, scarring, chronic pain and vision loss.

    LSCD occurs because of the loss of limbal epithelial stem cells, but Dr. Peng’s research hypothesizes that an enzyme his team has identified, factor inhibiting hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (FIH-1), may preserve more stem cells. The establishment of stem-cell enriched cultures has the potential to significantly improve the outcome of corneal transplantation for patients with LSCD.

    The Eye and Vision Research Grant program has awarded more than $3.5 million since 1980 to stimulate new and pioneering research. Several of these grant projects have led to larger studies and financial support from the National Institutes of Health.

    “There’s a real void when it comes to funding the initial investigative work that can launch new and groundbreaking discoveries,” said Dr. Gregory Grossman, Eversight Director of Research. “But Eversight is committed to supporting research that may potentially lead to innovative therapies and treatments.”

    The Eversight Center for Eye and Vision Research is one of the only eye bank-led programs focused on providing scientists with innovative resources they need to find new cures and treatments for blinding eye conditions. For more information, visit eversightvision.org/research.

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    – More –

    About Eversight: Eversight is a charitable, 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization whose mission is to restore sight and prevent blindness through the healing power of donation, transplantation and research. Our network of community eye banks—in Connecticut, Illinois, Michigan, New Jersey, Ohio and South Korea—is responsible for recovering, evaluating and providing human eye tissue for transplantation; supporting research into the causes and cures of blinding eye conditions; promoting donation awareness through public and professional education; and providing humanitarian aid to people around the world in need of corneal transplantation. For more information, visit eversightvision.org.

  • Skin Disease Research Center receives Honorable Mention at the 2016 Office of Research Core Facilities Colloquium
    09.26.2016

    Skin Disease Research Center is proud to announce that we have received Honorable Mention at the 2016 Office of Research’s Core Facilities Colloquium. Click here to view the award!

  • 06.16.2016

    The Skin Disease Research Center will be holding its 7th Annual Research Retreat on Thursday, July 21, 2016.

  • Outstanding Core Facility Award
    07.10.2015

    Skin Disease Research Center has received the Office of Research’s Outstanding Core Facility Award for 2015. This Award is bestowed on facilities that are scored in the top 10% of all Northwestern Core Facilities. The leadership of the SDRC are both humbled and proud to once again receive this award as it is a testament to our mission to provide the best services to our clients. As always, we are committed to continuously improve each of the SDRC cores and thank our clients for their continued use and support of these core facilities.

News

  • Skin Disease Research Center Director, Amy Paller, MD, selected as the recipient of the 2018 Wilma Bergfeld MD Visionary and Leadership Award
    12.11.2017

    The Skin Disease Research Center is proud to announce that our very own director, Amy Paller, MD, has been selected by her colleagues of the Women's Dermatologic Society to be the recipient of the 2018 Wilma Bergfeld, MD Visionary & Leadership Award. 

    She will receive the award in San Diego on Sunday, February 18, 2018. 

     

  • Roopal Kundu, MD, featured in Northwestern Magazine's Fall Issue
    11.01.2017

    Click here to view the story on Assistant Professor of Dermatology and Associate Dean for Admissions, Roopal Kundu, MD.

     

    

     

     

  • Dermatology featured in Northwestern Magazine's Fall Issue
    11.01.2017

    Click here to view the feature on the Department of Dermatology.

     

     

  • Eversight announces grant award for Northwestern University researcher, Han Peng, PhD
    08.18.2017

    hp1

    ANN ARBOR, Mich. — Eversight, a global nonprofit network of eye banks, has awarded a $15,000 Eye and Vision Research Grant to Northwestern University’s Han Peng, Ph.D.

    Dr. Peng was among nine recipients who received grants from Eversight for projects that aligned with the organization’s mission to restore sight and prevent blindness. The awards were determined by an independent review panel composed of distinguished scientists, ophthalmologists and health services researchers.

    Dr. Peng, a research assistant professor in the department of dermatology at Feinberg School of Medicine, is investigating a possible approach for improving the treatment of limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD), a problem that is often not recognized and treated in its early stages and may lead to corneal ulceration, scarring, chronic pain and vision loss.

    LSCD occurs because of the loss of limbal epithelial stem cells, but Dr. Peng’s research hypothesizes that an enzyme his team has identified, factor inhibiting hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (FIH-1), may preserve more stem cells. The establishment of stem-cell enriched cultures has the potential to significantly improve the outcome of corneal transplantation for patients with LSCD.

    The Eye and Vision Research Grant program has awarded more than $3.5 million since 1980 to stimulate new and pioneering research. Several of these grant projects have led to larger studies and financial support from the National Institutes of Health.

    “There’s a real void when it comes to funding the initial investigative work that can launch new and groundbreaking discoveries,” said Dr. Gregory Grossman, Eversight Director of Research. “But Eversight is committed to supporting research that may potentially lead to innovative therapies and treatments.”

    The Eversight Center for Eye and Vision Research is one of the only eye bank-led programs focused on providing scientists with innovative resources they need to find new cures and treatments for blinding eye conditions. For more information, visit eversightvision.org/research.

    hp2

    hp3

     

    – More –

    About Eversight: Eversight is a charitable, 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization whose mission is to restore sight and prevent blindness through the healing power of donation, transplantation and research. Our network of community eye banks—in Connecticut, Illinois, Michigan, New Jersey, Ohio and South Korea—is responsible for recovering, evaluating and providing human eye tissue for transplantation; supporting research into the causes and cures of blinding eye conditions; promoting donation awareness through public and professional education; and providing humanitarian aid to people around the world in need of corneal transplantation. For more information, visit eversightvision.org.

  • Skin Disease Research Center receives Honorable Mention at the 2016 Office of Research Core Facilities Colloquium
    09.26.2016

    Skin Disease Research Center is proud to announce that we have received Honorable Mention at the 2016 Office of Research’s Core Facilities Colloquium. Click here to view the award!

  • 06.16.2016

    The Skin Disease Research Center will be holding its 7th Annual Research Retreat on Thursday, July 21, 2016.

  • 06.13.2016

    SDRC member John Varga, MD, discusses recently published study findings in Nature Communications.

  • 06.03.2016

    Fourth-year medical student Derek Hsu (mentored by Jonathan Silverberg, MD/PhD/MPH, and SDRC Member), analyzes epidemiology of rare skin disorders.

  • Interested in Tissue Fibrosis?
    02.18.2016

    Interested in Tissue Fibrosis?  Join your colleagues in an interactive symposium!

    Fibrosis affects several organ systems, and is the focus of investigation for a large number of Northwestern faculty.

    The goal of this symposium is to stimulate discussion and ideas for collaboration at Northwestern on fibrosis and the interaction between the epithelium and mesenchyme.

    We encourage the Northwestern community to hear about the work in various organ systems being conducted on campus and to participate in this discussion.

    Join us Tuesday, March 15, 2016, from 1pm-3:15pm, at the Dale Hale Williams Auditorium (McGaw Building, 2nd floor).

         *Small group discussions toward research collaboration will follow, from 3pm-5pm.

    RSVP TODAY!

  • Getting to Know the SDRC, featuring Chyung-Ru Wang, PhD
    07.20.2015

    Chyung-Ru Wang, PhD, Professor in Microbiology-Immunology

    Dr. Wang is a 2015-2016 recipient of a SDRC Pilot and Feasibility Award

    What is your hometown?

    Taipei, TaiwanChyung-Ru Wang, PhD

    What brought you to Chicago?

    I was recruited to The University of Chicago as an assistant professor in 1994.

    Tell us something interesting or unique about yourself?

    I am an Asian female scientist.

    What do you like to do on your spare time?

    Play with my dog.

    Where did you get your undergraduate degree?

    National Taiwan University.

    What are your research interests?

    My lab is interested in understanding how MHC class Ib-restricted T cells are selected and regulated during development and how they contribute to the control of autoimmunity, anti-tumor immunity and infectious diseases. 

    What are your research aims through your P&F award?

    The goal of this P&F award is to evaluate the potential role of group 1 CD1-restricted autoreactive T cells, a novel subset of self-lipid antigen-specific T cells, in chronic inflammatory skin diseases, such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. It is built upon our observations in animal models, in which an increased frequency of autoreactive group 1 CD1-restricted T cells leads to the development of chronic skin inflammation under hyperlipidemic conditions. We propose to use the pilot grant to extend our study to patients with chronic skin diseases. We hope through this project we will be able to establish collaboration with investigators in SDRC and further understand the contribution of self lipid antigen-specific T cells in the pathogenesis of chronic skin diseases.

    Where did you work prior to Northwestern? What type of research did you do there?

    I was recruited from The University of Chicago to NU in 2008. I worked in the same research area since I was a graduate student.

    Where do you see yourself in the future?

    Continue to do research and mentor young scientists.

    Who/what has had the biggest influence in your life?

    My mother. She taught me "Be strict with yourself but be lenient with others".  Of course, this is not easy to do in a highly competitive environment.

  • Getting to Know the SDRC, featuring Aya Kobeissi
    07.10.2015

    Aya Kobeissi is the new Research Technologist at the Northwestern University Skin Disease Research Center. If you have further questions for Aya, please contact her at aya.kobeissi@northwestern.edu

    Where are you from? Where did you go to undergrad, what did you study?
    I am from the northwest suburbs of Chicago.  I received a Bachelor of Science degree in Neuroscience from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

    What does a typical day in your position entail?
    My typical day includes processing, embedding, cutting, and staining samples for either paraffin or frozen procedures.  I consult with researchers about their experimental goals and will customize protocols to achieve the highest morphological and visual quality.  Additionally, I create and test novel techniques that researchers can implement into their future studies.  I also provide technical training when requested.

    What is the most interesting thing about your job?
    The most interesting aspect of my job is the usual experiments that I work with.  I often receive sample which offer a challenge in tailoring each protocol. In the process, I learn more about each project and find the research being conducted fascinating.

    What is something about your position that has been a surprise to you?
    I was surprised at the wide range of departments that work with the SDRC.  For example, I have recently received requests involving eye and brain tissue.

    What are your future plans? 5 years, 10 years?
    I have been interested in research for a long time.  In a few years, I hope to attend graduate school for a PhD in Neuroscience.  Specifically, I am interested in basic and translational research involving stem cell and pharmacological treatments.

Honors

  • Eversight announces grant award for Northwestern University researcher, Han Peng, PhD
    08.18.2017

    hp1

    ANN ARBOR, Mich. — Eversight, a global nonprofit network of eye banks, has awarded a $15,000 Eye and Vision Research Grant to Northwestern University’s Han Peng, Ph.D.

    Dr. Peng was among nine recipients who received grants from Eversight for projects that aligned with the organization’s mission to restore sight and prevent blindness. The awards were determined by an independent review panel composed of distinguished scientists, ophthalmologists and health services researchers.

    Dr. Peng, a research assistant professor in the department of dermatology at Feinberg School of Medicine, is investigating a possible approach for improving the treatment of limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD), a problem that is often not recognized and treated in its early stages and may lead to corneal ulceration, scarring, chronic pain and vision loss.

    LSCD occurs because of the loss of limbal epithelial stem cells, but Dr. Peng’s research hypothesizes that an enzyme his team has identified, factor inhibiting hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (FIH-1), may preserve more stem cells. The establishment of stem-cell enriched cultures has the potential to significantly improve the outcome of corneal transplantation for patients with LSCD.

    The Eye and Vision Research Grant program has awarded more than $3.5 million since 1980 to stimulate new and pioneering research. Several of these grant projects have led to larger studies and financial support from the National Institutes of Health.

    “There’s a real void when it comes to funding the initial investigative work that can launch new and groundbreaking discoveries,” said Dr. Gregory Grossman, Eversight Director of Research. “But Eversight is committed to supporting research that may potentially lead to innovative therapies and treatments.”

    The Eversight Center for Eye and Vision Research is one of the only eye bank-led programs focused on providing scientists with innovative resources they need to find new cures and treatments for blinding eye conditions. For more information, visit eversightvision.org/research.

    hp2

    hp3

     

    – More –

    About Eversight: Eversight is a charitable, 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization whose mission is to restore sight and prevent blindness through the healing power of donation, transplantation and research. Our network of community eye banks—in Connecticut, Illinois, Michigan, New Jersey, Ohio and South Korea—is responsible for recovering, evaluating and providing human eye tissue for transplantation; supporting research into the causes and cures of blinding eye conditions; promoting donation awareness through public and professional education; and providing humanitarian aid to people around the world in need of corneal transplantation. For more information, visit eversightvision.org.